Skip to content

Squaw Bread

February 3, 2013

Squaw Bread (21)

 

Squaw Bread (19)

I love dark wheat bread like you get at Outback or The Cheesecake Factory.  This bread is a soft, sweet, hearty whole wheat bread.  The “secret” ingredient is McCormick’s Caramel Color.   Caramel color is not a food coloring.  It is burnt sugar.  You can buy or order it at Orson Gygi, which is a restaurant supply store in Salt Lake City.

Squaw Bread (4)

This 16 oz. bottle of caramel color will be good for 2 years.  After two years, it will turn into a thick, heavy sludge that will be impossible to pour out, water down, or use.  If you want a longer shelf life for your caramel color, you may want to purchase the powdered form of caramel color from King Arthur Flour.

Squaw Bread (3)

This recipe makes either 2 large loaves, 3 – 4 medium loaves, or 8 small loaves.

2 1/2 cups room temperature water* (100°-110°F)

4 T. butter, margarine or vegetable oil

2 T. caramel color

1/2 cup honey

Combine first 4 ingredients (water, oil, color, honey) and mix well.

Squaw Bread (5)

3 1/2 cups wheat flour

Pour wheat flour on top of wet ingredients.

1 T. cocoa

2 T. active dry yeast

2 T. vital wheat gluten

2 tsp. salt

Add cocoa, yeast, gluten and salt.

Squaw Bread (6)

Stir until well blended.

Squaw Bread (7)

Allow mixture to sponge for 10 minutes.  The sponging processes gives the bran in the wheat flour a chance to absorb the liquids, resulting in a lighter loaf of bread.  You may notice bubbles, which is just the yeast at work.

In the meantime, set your oven on the Warm setting.

3 1/2 – 4 1/2 cups flour  (I used 3 1/2)

Add flour, one cup at a time, and knead until the dough clings to the hook, and cleans the sides of mixer, and is soft and elastic.

Squaw Bread (8)

Squaw Bread (9)

Turn oven off.

Give the top of the dough a light misting of canola oil spray and cover it with plastic wrap.  Place it in the oven until doubled in size, about 20-30 minutes.

Squaw Bread (10)

Divide dough into 3 piles (or 2 large or 8 small), cover with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 5 minutes.

Shape loaves into desired size “logs”.

Put oats in a shallow pan.

Roll loaf in oats.

Squaw Bread (13)

 

Squaw Bread (20)

Cover loaves with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until desired size.  Don’t have them touch each other.

2 large loaves – Bake at 350 degrees for 35 – 40  minutes

3 – 4 medium loaves – Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes

8 small loaves – Bake at 350 degrees for 20 – 25 minutes

After baking, immediately place loaves on a wire cooling rack.

Squaw Bread (23)

Weight Watchers: Entire recipe is 99 PointsPlus – so figure points per size of loaves and amount of slices.

Recipe Source:  Revised from Frieda Loves Bread (found on Pinterest)

FULL RECIPE WITHOUT PICTURES —

SQUAW BREAD

I love dark wheat bread like you get at Outback or The Cheesecake Factory.  This bread is a soft, sweet, hearty whole wheat bread.  The “secret” ingredient is McCormick’s Caramel Color.   Caramel color is not a food coloring.  It is burnt sugar.  You can buy or order it at Orson Gygi, which is a restaurant supply store in Salt Lake City.

This 16 oz. bottle of caramel color will be good for 2 years.  After two years, it will turn into a thick, heavy sludge that will be impossible to pour out, water down, or use.  If you want a longer shelf life for your caramel color, you may want to purchase the powdered form of caramel color from King Arthur Flour.

2 1/2 cups room temperature water* (100°-110°F)

4 T. butter, margarine or vegetable oil

2 T. caramel color

1/2 cup honey

3 1/2 cups wheat flour

3 1/2 – 4 1/2 cups flour

2 T. cocoa

2 T. active dry yeast

2 T. vital wheat gluten

2 tsp. salt

about 1/2 cup oats

This recipe makes either 2 large loaves, 3 – 4 medium loaves, or 8 small loaves.

Combine first 4 ingredients (water, oil, color, honey) and mix well.

Pour wheat flour on top of wet ingredients.

Add cocoa, yeast, gluten and salt. Stir until well blended.

Allow mixture to sponge for 10 minutes.  The sponging processes gives the bran in the wheat flour a chance to absorb the liquids, resulting in a lighter loaf of bread.  You may notice bubbles, which is just the yeast at work.

In the meantime, set your oven on the Warm setting.

Add flour, one cup at a time, and knead until the dough clings to the hook, and almost cleans the sides of mixer, and is soft and elastic.

Turn oven off.

Give the top a light misting of canola oil spray and cover it with plastic wrap.  Place it in the oven until doubled in size, about 20-30 minutes.

Divide dough into 3 piles (or 2 large or 8 small), cover with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 5 minutes.

Shape loaves into desired size “logs”.

Put oats in a shallow pan.

Roll loaves in oats.

Cover loaves with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until desired size.  Don’t have them touch each other.

2 large loaves – Bake at 350 degrees for 35 – 40  minutes

3 – 4 medium loaves – Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes

8 small loaves – Bake at 350 degrees for 20 – 25 minutes

After baking, immediately place loaves on a wire cooling rack.

Weight Watchers: Entire recipe is 99 PointsPlus – so figure points per size of loaves and amount of slices.

Recipe Source:  Revised from Frieda Loves Bread (found on Pinterest)

8 Comments leave one →
  1. Melinda Mitchell permalink
    February 12, 2014 6:05 pm

    Is flour supposed to be AP flour or bread flour?

  2. darelle permalink
    July 18, 2014 8:19 pm

    Hi! I was wondering if you ever put this recipe in loaf pans? And if you did. Did you grease the pans or let the dough stick to the sides of the pan to help it bake and rise properly?

    • July 22, 2014 4:10 pm

      Yes, I have put it in loaf pans and it turns out just fine. Don’t let it rise too high though – it gets too airy. I was going for the “Cheesecake Factory” type bread so that is why I prefer to just form it into loaves. As far as using the loaf pans, I greased the pans as I would regular type bread.

  3. Kasey permalink
    September 23, 2014 3:35 pm

    I have a child allergic to chocolate. Can I substitute something for the cocoa powder or just leave it out all together?

  4. MorganaLeFae permalink
    February 23, 2015 4:55 am

    I just recently move to the UK and loved squaw bread needless to say you can’t get it over here as well as a great deal of things I’m use to being able to get in the USA. my question is can I make squaw bread with out the caramel color? if not is there a way I can make something close to it at home? and is the vital wheat gluten really needed? just asking as I really want some squaw bread been craving it for the last week guess that’s what happend when your excepting lol

    • March 12, 2015 12:15 pm

      Sorry it has taken me so long to get back to you. I am just guessing but I think the caramel color is simply to make it dark. My suggestion is to just try it without the caramel color and the gluten and see if it works out.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: